EP7 – Building The Perfect Team For Your Business

This episode breaks down the popular DiSC personality profile and teaches leaders how to build the perfect team for their business.

The Growability® podcast is designed to teach business owners and non-profit leaders a more excellent way to run their business.

Podcast Transcript:

Joshua MacLeod:
In any business, when I walk into a room or I pick up the phone or I’m talking with the president of the organization down to the whatever the lowest paid person is on the totem pole, every person in an organization is going to have a distinct personality. Humans are not robots, so we not only have strength sets, but we have personality sets. And I am not really going to give my best or perform at my highest level until my personality is celebrated.

Podcast Announcer:
Welcome to The Growability Podcast, teaching business and nonprofit leaders a more excellent way to run a business. Visit Growability.com for your leadership, coaching, consultation, and business collaboration needs. Today’s episode is about building the perfect team for your business. Here are your hosts, Joshua MacLeod and Bernie Anderson.

Bernie Anderson:
We’ve been talking a lot about vision, so the question that I have this week for you is how do we build a team so that we can actually accomplish our vision? Teamwork. How do you build a team to accomplish vision? The first thing to really understand about building a team is you build a team based on what are the leadership needs, what are the management needs, and what are the marketing needs of our organization.

Bernie Anderson:
Leadership is primarily about growth and opportunity. Management is primarily about productivity and profit. Marketing is about influence and relationships. I think one of the best stories about the balance between the leader and the manager and the marketer is the Walt Disney story. Okay, so Walt Disney is like this animator. He is a fountain extraordinaire. He’s coming up with concepts like Mickey Mouse and Disneyland. And the thing that we don’t learn about Walt Disney is that he like failed every business endeavor that he ever did until he calls his brother, Roy.

Bernie Anderson:
Roy was very good at numbers, very good at systems, very good at thinking through the entire equation all the way through. Walt could walk into a room and sell everybody. Roy built all the systems and processes. He found the right talent to actually go implement, the right contractors, the right builders, the right team. In the organization, you had a leadership need. That was Walt Disney. You had a management need. That was Roy Disney. And you had a marketing need. That was Walt Disney again.

Bernie Anderson:
If, at a scale of one to 10, Walt Disney is a 10 on the leadership scene, he’s a two on the management scene, and he’s a 10 on the marketing scene, the organization is only ever going to advance to a two until you have Roy Disney. Roy Disney is a 10 on the management scene, so now I’ve got a 10 in leadership, I’ve got a 10 in management, I’ve got a ten in marketing, and that’s what, now we have Disney World.

Bernie Anderson:
This is so good because leadership oftentimes gets stereotyped into this leader who’s like slaving over his desk and like coming up with ideas. And the story that is beautiful is that behind all of this, it’s not just Walt Disney. It’s not just Steve Jobs. It’s not just Jack at Twitter or like whoever it is, like whoever the leader is that’s made something great. There’s a team of people behind her or him. How does individual personality play into this?

Joshua MacLeod:
Perhaps one of my favorite things to teach at Growability, Bernie, is our DISC profile training.

Bernie Anderson:
Not going to lie. I think it’s the same for me as well.

Joshua MacLeod:
That’s really good. In any business, when I walk into a room or I pick up the phone or I’m talking with the president of the organization down to the whatever the lowest paid person is on the totem pole, every person in an organization is going to have a distinct personality. Humans are not robots, so we not only have strength sets, but we have personality sets. And I am not really going to give my best or perform at my highest level until my personality is celebrated. Even if I have all the strengths in the world, if I don’t have an environment where my personality is also celebrated, then I’m not really going to give my best.

Joshua MacLeod:
I like how Gary Smalley actually took the DISC profile, and he put an animal personality with each one of these. The D personality is the dominant. This is the lion. Your I is an otter, your S is a golden retriever, and your C is the busy beaver. Let’s break down. Let’s look at each one of those, and then we’ll kind of break that down, and we’ll talk about what does that role play in an organization?

Joshua MacLeod:
The D personality is typically more in the leadership sphere than in the management sphere. It’s Rocky Balboa. Basically, I’m going to go do this thing, and if I get the tar beat out of me, I’m still going to get up, and I’m going to go do it. It’s Steve Jobs. It’s Iron Man. There are two fundamental things that everybody should understand about the D personality. The first is their core value is respect. If you’re working with a D person and you don’t show them respect, then they’ll just eat you for lunch, and they’ll go move on. The second is they’re fundamentally bent on winning. D personalities love to win. If they’re not winning, they’re not happy. Second place is the first loser. That’s the D personality.

Bernie Anderson:
This is how I know my wife is a very strong D personality. I live with a strong D. She loves winning, man. She just loves winning.

Joshua MacLeod:
Yeah, so I definitely have a high D in my personality, so if I’m playing Monopoly with my kids and I’ve got like my 4-year-old there, I’m trying to absolutely dominate. I’m trying to absolutely … They’re going bankrupt. They might be crying a little bit, but it’s okay. You have the important life lessons, honey. That’s why you just landed on Park Place, and you’re dead. That’s D. They like to win.

Joshua MacLeod:
The next personality is the I personality. The I personality is like the otter. The I personality has a fundamental question in the back of their mind: what is going to be fun? What does fun look like? In every office, we have people who come into work and suddenly work gets more fun. You’re working at the coffee shop, you’re doing the thing, and the I comes in. We’re laughing more or enjoying work. Where did the time go? This is so fun. The other personality types can forget that we’re human beings and not just human doings. You’re allowed to have fun at work, and you should have fun at work. Is never forget this should be fun.

Joshua MacLeod:
The core value for the I is freedom. If you try to put an I in a box and you tell them, “These are the constraints of what you have to do, and you’re going to have to clock in for three minutes, and if I see that three minutes and it’s not exactly right,” the I is like, “I quit. I’m out of here. I’m bringing my fun to somewhere else.”

Joshua MacLeod:
The third personality is the S personality. This is the golden retriever. This is the steady personality. The S personality really cares about balance. Whenever they’re presented with a new opportunity or a new person walks into the room, it’s just like the golden retriever. They’re kind of staring you down a little bit. Is this person safe for me? Is this person safe for our team? They are into the win-win-win. It’s good for me. It’s good for the organization. It’s good for you. It’s a win-win-win. They really like balance.

Joshua MacLeod:
And then the final personality is the C personality. The C personality is primarily about reliability. I want to know, will this work over and over again?

Joshua MacLeod:
Now, in any organization, there are four ingredients that are necessary for that organization. The first one is winning. An organization that wins does better than an organization that doesn’t win. If I’m in Nashville and the Titans are winning, it’s good for the city. It’s also good for the Titans franchise. They can get better players.

Joshua MacLeod:
The I is fun. Every organization needs to have fun. If I’m not having fun in my organization, then it’s like you’re going to spend the majority of your life and the hours at a thing that is not fun. Don’t do that. Run away.

Joshua MacLeod:
The S is all about balance, and every organization needs to have balance. If the bottom line is good for my team, that’s great. If the bottom line is exploiting my team, it’s like, well, let’s go back to the dark ages and set up these 12-hour-a-day factories. That’s horrible. You need balance in your organization.

Joshua MacLeod:
And then the final thing, every organization needs reliability. As an organization, are we putting out the same quality every time that we put something out?

Joshua MacLeod:
What happens is is if you have the right personality, they can influence the need of the organization. If your organization needs to win, you need people in your organization who are Ds. If your organization needs more fun, you need people in your organization who are Is. If your organization needs more balance, you need people in your organization who are Ss. And if your organization needs more reliability, you need more people in your organization who are Cs. If you miss that personality ingredient, then your organization, it’s either not going to win or not going to have fun or not going to have balance or not going to have reliability.

Bernie Anderson:
That gives us, I think, a really helpful and simple framework for how do I build this team that’s going to accomplish my vision?

Joshua MacLeod:
Hiring will make or break your organization. It’s like 80% of the problems in your organization are hiring problems. And I think as I’m considering hiring, there’s two primary considerations that I need to make when I hire someone. The first is what is their primary strength? The second consideration is what is their personality style? What we tend to do when we hire somebody is we tend to hire somebody that has our same strength set or our same personality set. What we really need to do is hire somebody that has a complementary strength set and a complementary personality set. I might be in an interview with the very best hire that I could ever bring into my organization, but while I’m in this interview, I’m like, “Eh, kind of, really … I don’t really like them that much,” because I’m not thinking of them based on what does this organization really need. I’m thinking of them based on what are the strengths that I understand and I can tell that this is a good strength, or what is my personality that I recommend that we’re going to get along.

Joshua MacLeod:
When in reality, when you think of it from the organizational standpoint, it’s really more of a question of who’s going to help me become the best person that I can be, and how can I help this person become the best person that they can be? We are community immature when we hire. Most businesses are sort of personality, strength, and community immature. And we need to be a little bit more mature to reach our full potential.

Joshua MacLeod:
Companies like Apple, companies like Microsoft, companies like wherever, Home Depot or whatever-

Bernie Anderson:
Netflix-

Joshua MacLeod:
They’re mature. They hire the right people, and that’s why their organizations blow up and thrive.

Bernie Anderson:
I think that’s really good. Hey, Joshua, I think we should probably wrap it up then. Because next week I really am looking forward to talking about strengths profiles and how that works. Let’s just also remind people that if you are interested in your business having a team assessment, we can do that. Josh or I would love to come and connect with your team and really do a full assessment of your team and just to see where you are, see where you’re at. That’s something we can talk to you about. Growability.com.

Joshua MacLeod:
What’s crazy when we do this training, Bernie, is people have been working together for 10 years, and then they’re like, “Oh, you’re not like evil.”

Bernie Anderson:
Right.

Joshua MacLeod:
That’s just the way you’re wired.

Bernie Anderson:
Yes.

Joshua MacLeod:
Oh, and like, oh, every one of us has the same strength, but we actually need a different strength. Like for our role. It’s the biggest “aha” moment during the training with clients is a lot of “aha” going on.

Bernie Anderson:
Yeah. Yeah.

Joshua MacLeod:
If you want to understand why you don’t like Joan in accounting, the crazy people you work with, they’re driving you crazy, then call Growability. We can help with your team for sure. All day long.

Bernie Anderson:
Yeah, absolutely.

Joshua MacLeod:
All right.

Bernie Anderson:
Absolutely.

Joshua MacLeod:
Great.

Bernie Anderson:
All right, my friend. Have a great week.

Joshua MacLeod:
All right, we’ll see you next Monday.

Podcast Announcer:
Thank you for listening to The Growability Podcast. We hope this episode helps you run your business in a more excellent way. The mission of Growability is to equip leaders to flourish in their life and work by developing vision, rhythm, and community. Visit Growability.com for more information and to talk with a Growability coach.