EP1 – Introducing Joshua & Bernie

The Growability® podcast is designed to teach business owners and non-profit leaders a more excellent way to run their business. This episode introduces your hosts Bernie Anderson and Joshua MacLeod.

Podcast Transcript

Joshua MacLeod:
I realized that it wasn’t so much ideas that were bringing about good in the world, but it really was leaders who would apply their information. It was leaders who could turn an idea into reality.

Podcast Announcer:
Welcome to the Growability podcast, teaching business owners and nonprofit leaders, a more excellent way to run their business. In this episode, we’ll meet the hosts of the growability podcast, Joshua MacLeod, and Bernie Anderson, both Joshua and Bernie are senior consultants with growability. The mission of Growability is to equip leaders to flourish in their life and work by cultivating vision, rhythm and community. We’re here,

Bernie Anderson:
Man, we got

Joshua MacLeod:
It.

Bernie Anderson:
Alright. This is the Growability podcast where we are going to be teaching business owners and non-profit leaders a more excellent way to run their business or their organization. It’s 12 o’clock and here we go. I don’t know about you, but I’ve got all kinds of time on my hands. You know, we’re bored. We have nothing to do. And so we’re doing a podcast and a live stream, but I, yeah, for real, why are we, what is the, what do you think is the purpose behind what we’re doing right now?

Joshua MacLeod:
For me, I wanted to make some of the things that we’ve learned and all of the knowledge that you and I have put together over several decades of leadership study and business study, and just make it available to people for free. That’s what I’m passionate about. How about you, Bernie? What’s exciting to you about the podcast. Why do you want to co-host this with your schedule?

Bernie Anderson:
My learning styles, high audio. I mean, I listened to just about everything that I learned from, right? And so to me, having a time where we have conversation about these things, I’m just grateful to be able to learn from people that we may have on here as guests eventually. And I just, I love this format, which actually that kind of reminds me of Joshua. Like there may be a lot of people are going to know who we are right now because we’re basically on our own feeds, but like, who are we? What do we do? I think that would also be a great,

Joshua MacLeod:
Yeah, well, you know, one of the, one of the best questions that I like to ask someone, and it really is a good question for anybody to ask. And this is a question that I often lead off with when I’m in an initial meeting with someone, is how did you get to where you are? So for me, when I was in my earlier career climbing the corporate ladder in corporate America, I was working in the litigation industry and I was really exposed to kind of wealth and power and opulence. And I’m working with attorneys that have more than five cars and you know, some of them own an island and a jet. And, uh, you know, so I’m, I’m looking at this, but when I was climbing the corporate ladder for about five years, I wasn’t really happy. You know, I’m halfway up the ladder and I look around the side of the front of the building and there’s a big marquee that says greed and power found here.

Joshua MacLeod:
You know, all you gotta do is make it to the top of the ladder. And I was like, if that’s what’s at the top of the ladder, like, what is this worth pursuing? Like I’m not into that. So I was able to take seven years and visit 21 countries. And I was able to pursue a career that I love. I was a filmmaker and I was telling the stories of amazing people, orphanages and aids clinics and going into war zones and all that. That’s what it was a long story. I realized that it wasn’t so much ideas that were bringing about good in the world, but it really was leaders who would apply their information. It was leaders who could turn an idea into reality. And so as a filmmaker, I was spending all of my time, just sharing ideas. I was spending all of my time showing the idea of why they’re doing this or what they’re into, but what I became fascinated in the travels is more the how, how did you actually build this thing and the “what”, what are you doing to accomplish this?

Joshua MacLeod:
And, and traveling around the world with the not only going to the orphanage, but sitting on the plane next to the guy that’s funding the orphanage that has a small business. And I’m like, so how did you build your small business? How did you grow? What did you do? And what books should I read? So I had seven years where it was just an immersive intercultural experience, traveling all over the world, learning from what I would consider the best leaders in the world. It takes a lot, you know, about this. It takes a lot to live in another country. It takes a lot to Excel in another country to build something that’s lasting. So in 2010, I was challenged by the president of a foundation that said, I think you’re, you’re too smart to only be a filmmaker. And all my filmmaker friends, that would be like, what are some of them would be like, well, yeah, you know, we’re good artists.

Joshua MacLeod:
We don’t have to crunch numbers. Like don’t mix an artist with an accounting spreadsheet or you’re going to get in a lot of trouble. And so he really challenged me is that if you want to make a difference in the world, then you should go into consulting and you should train leaders and you can go and work with somebody for like six months and impact the next 20 to 30 years of their life and really help them achieve and grow. And so I’ve, I’ve now spent 15,000 hours. There’s like some book out there and you probably know the title of it is like to become an expert at anything. You spend 10,000 hours. I’m at one of those and a half and spent like 15,000 hours in leadership development, management, development, marketing development. And we talk about a lot, Bernie that there’s really in any organization when you’re running an organization, there’s three primary needs.

Joshua MacLeod:
One need is leadership. And this is how do I deal with opportunity? How do I deal with change? And then there’s a second need, which is management, which is how do I create profitability and how do I create efficiency? Like how do we keep this thing ongoing? And then there’s the third, which is marketing, which is how do I create influence? How do I make a difference in my community and gain the support that I need from friends. We’re always thinking about all three of those things at the same time. We’re not just a leadership organization. We’re not just a management organization. We’re not just a marketing organization, but we really try to build tools that emphasize the synergy between leadership management and marketing. And I think that’s why we’ve, you know, that’s why we have a podcast that’s where we’ve kind of found success. So that’s my background. That’s why I’m on the podcast. Flip the script back to you.

Bernie Anderson:
Yeah, I came here by a very different road than you did, but has a lot of similarities. And, um, just very briefly, I started as a very young kid. I can’t believe that there was a church called faith community church in Franklin, Tennessee that said, yeah, we want you to be our pastor, even though you’re like 24. And I don’t know. Yeah. So it’s, uh, I went through 13 years of basically learning how to disciple people, how to actually develop leaders and made a lot of mistakes and learned a lot of ways of not, how to develop leaders there. We actually thought we were going to be at that church for the rest of our lives. I mean, that was my plan. It wasn’t what the actual plan was. So I ended up at…

Joshua MacLeod:
So somebody bigger than us that has a plan

Bernie Anderson:
Has a plan for us, for sure. Yeah. Like it’s a, and I think it was really a big thing to learn during that time. So after 13 years into this work there, where you are in Tennessee, my wife and two kids, and I, we kind of packed our bags and moved to outer Mongolia for,

Joshua MacLeod:
To go somewhere, just outer Mongolia. When I talk about traveling, I’m like, yeah, I’ve been to like the part of Mongolia that isn’t like outer Mongolia, you know, go to Mongolia. I went to

Bernie Anderson:
That’s. Right. And yeah, when you were there, we went to some very outer places about, for sure, we spent two years in language and culture learning. And, and what we realized in that setting is that this whole idea of leadership development is absolutely crucial. If you are doing business, if you were doing ministry, if you’re doing nonprofit work, I mean, the fact is, is there certain skills, habits, rhythms, things that you, as a leader need to learn, and actually we all need help and coaching with. So fast forward to 2014, I returned home from Mongolia. And at that point I did some fundraising work for a world relief and work with them for several years. And I’m like, the piece that I feel like is my calling and my purpose in life is to help people become the leaders that they were meant and made to be, and to help them thrive in that, to help them understand their strengths, to understand how to come together and community and how to really have an experience of something bigger than themselves for us in our faith. That’s God. And what that means. I mean, that’s, I just think that’s really important shared all this with you. And, you know, it was sort of a, a real, I think a divine appointment sort of situation where that’s been good,

Joshua MacLeod:
One of the things that I look for in strong leaders is people who’ve been knocked down and punched in the face. Uh, and then they get back up and they keep going. It’s something that you didn’t say, but I think any leader or anybody maybe that’s over 40, will have in their life is we’re going to have some seasons where it’s dry, you know, and it’s really hard. But if you think about our lives, kind of like a tree, it’s those dry seasons that allow the roots in our lives to grow down deep and to find there’s like deeper Wells, like, you know, as the water table is a lot of times it’s very deep under the ground. Like we’re in dark horse Sudan where you have to go down a football field to find some deep water, but it’s there.

Joshua MacLeod:
Even if there’s a, there’s a, an absolute, you know, 104 degree day outside, but a football field deep, there’s some clean cold water. And I think it’s those seasons of challenge and difficulty that allow us to find that deep water, and then that deep water, I think there’s, there’s wisdom is part of that. And that wisdom is stuff that we can share. Uh, so for you, I thought, man, here’s a guy that has seen enough life to find some deep water. And it’s encouraging to know that you’re able to share that with each of the clients that you work with, you know, teaching the collaborative groups that you do, the business training,

Bernie Anderson:
Beats us up and matures us all at the same time. And that’s okay. That’s okay. Um,

Joshua MacLeod:
And the fact that you’ve read more books than me, which is hard to do that, I was like, okay, okay. I can, I can bring Bernie in, he’s a syntopical processor, so….

Podcast Announcer:
You have been listening to the growability podcast, teaching business owners and nonprofit leaders, a more excellent way to run their business. This podcast was edited from the growability weekly live lunch, and learn hosted on Facebook and YouTube at 12 central each week. Thanks for listening for help in growing your business, visit growability.com to discover a great coach course or consultation for your business. You can also find great content on our Facebook, YouTube, and LinkedIn pages.